COVERS GENERAL INFORMATION

Staining (non-colourfast textiles)

“Non-colourfast” textiles, e.g. blue denim, t-shirts or similar, especially in strong colours, can easily stain light or plain cover fabrics, including almost all decorative fabrics or materials, such as cushion and sofa covers etc. These stains cannot be removed from most fabrics and can only be removed from covered leathers if done quickly. There is therefore no justifiable reason for complaint about the furniture, because the damage has been caused by other, non-colourfast fabrics, such as jeans.

Chemical reaction

Changes or damages, e.g. colour changes or damage to materials, may result if fabric or leather covers come into contact with chemical or acidic substances by which we mean, for example, residue in damp hair or towels after washing or colouring your hair.

Lustre from use, sheen, changes in pile direction

This effect occurs in all velour or velour-like surfaces such as fitted carpets or textiles. The higher the pile (soft and fluffy), the flatter it will lie as a result of bodyweight, warmth and seating habits. It will change with a light/dark or matt/gloss effect depending on how the light falls or the viewing angle. This is not a defect but a property that is characteristic of the product. It does not have any effect on the use, benefits, function or lifespan of the cover. This kind of light/dark effect can occur, in particular, at the seams of chenille or velour fabrics with contrasting thread. This is a visual phenomenon that is characteristic of the product and does not mean that the seams are crooked.

Odour

Opinions about odours are very subjective. It is generally accepted that new products have a smell in the beginning and wooden materials of all kinds, varnish, upholstery and leather products often have a powerful, individual scent that can last for a few weeks or months, depending on the materials and how they are put together. Regular airing is the best solution. Odours and vapour in general, for example from the kitchen, open fire, tobacco or from outdoors can seep into upholstery fabrics or become stuck to the surface. Some products, such as solid wood or leather, retain a certain, individual scent for years.

Microfibre cloth

Unfortunately, advertisements do not always keep their promises. Not every product that is available for chrome, stainless steel, metal, mirrors and glass is also suitable for furniture. To be on the safe side and from experience we would recommend that you do not use microfibre cloths for upholstered furniture covers, for example leather, artificial leather or any kind of fabric. Soft, clean cloths, such as tea towels or wash leather are much better, especially when used with the right cleaning products.

Electrostatic charge

Electrostatic charge is something that we are all familiar with from our cars during the winter and it can be painful for sensitive persons. Electrostatic charge is primarily related to very dry air in the living space over a long time, i.e. usually a few weeks. It mainly occurs during the winter, on hot summer days and in combination with the synthetic materials found in fitted carpets, textiles, textile upholstery covers and leather. If this happens, air humidity must be increased, for example by adding houseplants, putting damp cloths on radiators or using an air humidifier.

Air humidity, heating, room climate

Furniture and upholstered furniture in general should not be exposed to extremes of high or low air humidity. See also Underfloor heating. According to expert recommendations, room climate should have an annual average humidity of 42-55% for people and materials. If the air is too dry, electrostatic charges can build up in fabrics or leather and they can dry out and become brittle. Permanently damp walls risk mould and damage.

Special tip

You should bear in mind that the powerful effects of light, in particular sunlight and long-lasting proximity to radiators and heaters dries out leather and makes it porous and brittle. Direct sources of heat can also cause leather to dry out and fade. In any case, leather needs regular cleaning and care suited to its type, quality and purpose.

Sensitivity

It is generally accepted that light-coloured and plain covers are generally more sensitive and that they show up stains and signs of usage more quickly. That applies to “natural products” in general and the more natural a product is, the more sensitive it will be to external influences.

Friction resistance

Natural materials have lower friction resistance and dye can therefore rub off them more easily, especially in combination with moisture such as perspiration.

Pilling

Small fibres or pieces of fibre are always becoming detached from textiles, especially other textiles such as blankets or clothes. These fibres stick to the surface of the fabric where they tend to felt and form little balls, which is known as pilling. We recommend using a pilling comb to get rid of these little balls.

Leather colour deviations / differences

In semi-aniline leather slight differences in colour are a given, as are minimal colour differences in pigmented leather. Aniline leather is completely natural and the surface is not sealed with pigmentation. No one hide is ever like another and the dermis can differ greatly within one delivery and even within one hide. The grain pattern can also look very different. Greater differences in colour are not justifiable grounds for complaint! Ordering a sofa whose colour and surface are the same as the display sofa or the collection sample is never guaranteed.

Light-fastness (effects or light on furniture)

Light-fastness describes a material’s resistance to the effects of light (especially sunlight, daylight and halogen light etc.). Light sources such as these and, in particular, sunlight alter surfaces, especially wooden surfaces or LEATHER. This “sunburn” results in changes in colour due to the chemical structure. Natural woods may get darker or become yellowed and stained woods may fade. Protect your precious furniture from direct light!!! The elemental force of the sun changes all materials. Natural leather, in particular, may change colour after just a few weeks. Particular caution is advised in bright, south-facing rooms with lots of windows, where curtains or blinds should be closed in direct sunlight, otherwise a surface may lighten or darken where the sun has been shining on it after a relatively short time. However, “colour changes” such as these do not have any effect on use or lifespan.

Special tip

You should bear in mind that the powerful effects of light, in particular sunlight and long-lasting proximity to radiators and heaters dries out leather and makes it porous and brittle. Direct sources of heat can also cause leather to dry out and fade. In any case, leather needs regular cleaning and care suited to its type, quality and purpose.